Common Questions



1. How young can a child be tested?
2. How long is the testing?
3. When will we get the results?
4. Who are reports sent to?
5. Will you attend school meetings or "teams"?
6. Is follow-up evaluation required?
7. Will you provide specific recommendations?
8. What is Neurolinguistics?

1. How young can a child be tested?


The scientific research clearly supports the benefits of early intervention. Although we may not do formal standardized testing until a child is 3 years old we can get helpful baseline information on an 18 month to 2 year old toddler who is delayed in development.

2. How long is the testing?


Usually comprehensive educational and language testing takes 2 to 3 hours depending on the age and needs of the child. If an IQ test is also needed this can take another 45minutes to an hour and may be scheduled separately.

3. When will we get the results?


A feedback conference is usually held immediately following the testing. This usually takes about an hour. The written report should be available in 15 business days or 3 weeks.

4. Who are reports sent to?


Reports are automatically sent to parents. At their request a report can also be sent to the school or the physician.

5. Will you attend school meetings or "teams"?


Yes. It is often beneficial to collaborate directly with teachers, therapists and school administrators.

6. Is follow-up evaluation required?


This is determined on an individual basis. With preschool children, yearly assessments are often recommended, but with school age youngsters reevaluation may only be needed every 3 to 5 years or to assist with school transitions. Specific skill assessment, such as reading, may be recommended more frequently to look at progress.

7. Will you provide specific recommendations?


Specific recommendations for parents, tutors and schools will be offered. When needed referrals for tutors or therapists will also be made available.

8. What is Neurolinguistics?


Neurolinguistics is the part of neuroscience that is concerned with the neurological basis of communication, namely the comprehension and formulation of language in all its modes, including speech, reading and writing. Clinical Neurolinguistics applies the latest developments in human neuroscience to the diagnosis and treatment of all types of communication disorders.